Other Services

School Physicals

What a School Physical Includes

Physicians will check your athlete’s vitals, joints, and flexibility. They’ll also check your athlete’s vision and do a short fitness assessment to diagnose and recommend any possible limitations on physical activity.

It’s not necessary for you to bring a vaccination record with you to receive a physical.  However, please be aware that some states require your child’s immunization record before he or she can begin a new sport.

Vitals check

We’ll check your child’s pulse and blood pressure to ensure proper vitals. We’ll also document his or her weight and height, since growth spurts and weight changes can place added stress on joints, muscles, and bones.

Eye exam

An eye exam checks for proper vision and evaluates whether your child needs prescription lenses or if his or her current prescription needs to be adjusted.

Fitness assessment

Next we’ll examine your child’s heart, lungs, abdomen, ears, nose, and throat. We’ll check his or her cardiovascular system and recommending any limitations on physical activity.

Joints and flexibility check

By testing your child’s strength, flexibility, posture, and joints, we can identify any areas that may be prone to injury as well as suggest potential exercises and tips to help build a healthier body.

Medical history review

A medical history is just as important as a medical examination. Knowing about any past illnesses, surgeries, or conditions, such as asthma or chest pains, will help diagnose problems and prevent complications in the future.

Sports Physicals

What a Sports Physical Includes

Physicians will check your athlete’s vitals, joints, and flexibility. They’ll also check your athlete’s vision and do a short fitness assessment to diagnose and recommend any possible limitations on physical activity.

It’s not necessary for you to bring a vaccination record with you to receive a physical. However, please be aware that some states require your child’s immunization record before he or she can begin a new sport.

Vitals check

We’ll check your child’s pulse and blood pressure to ensure proper vitals. We’ll also document his or her weight and height, since growth spurts and weight changes can place added stress on joints, muscles, and bones.

Eye exam

An eye exam checks for proper vision and evaluates whether your child needs prescription lenses or if his or her current prescription needs to be adjusted.

Fitness assessment

Next we’ll examine your child’s heart, lungs, abdomen, ears, nose, and throat. We’ll check his or her cardiovascular system and recommending any limitations on physical activity.

Joints and flexibility check

By testing your child’s strength, flexibility, posture, and joints, we can identify any areas that may be prone to injury as well as suggest potential exercises and tips to help build a healthier body.

Medical history review

A medical history is just as important as a medical examination. Knowing about any past illnesses, surgeries, or conditions, such as asthma or chest pains, will help diagnose problems and prevent complications in the future.

DMV Physicals

What Should You Expect During a DMV Physical Examination?

A DMV physical exam has many different components. Here are the six things to expect during a DMV physical.1

1. Medical History

During a DMV physical, the driver will need to provide extensive background on their medical history, including past surgeries, medications taken, and history of health conditions. It is important to be honest when providing health history as there could be repercussions later on if the correct health history is not provided.

2. Vitals Testing and Physical Examination

A large portion of the DMV physical is testing vitals. Testing includes pulse, height, weight, and blood pressure. The FMCSA also requires urinalysis, which looks at the protein, blood, and sugar in a urine sample to rule out underlying medical problems.

3. Vision Testing

In addition to more general testing, the FMSCA requires vision testing to ensure drivers are meeting the standard of at least 20/40 vision acuity in each eye with or without correction (glasses or contacts) and at least 70° field of vision in horizontal meridian measured in each eye (the area of visibility for each eye’s line of sight).

4. Physical Examination 

A physical examination is also required and the examiner will first evaluate general physical appearance for things such as obesity and other medical conditions, and then examine the various body systems, including skin, lungs, the neurological system, and more.

5. Drug Screen

Although it is not part of the DOT physical exam, the DMV also requires a drug screen which can usually be completed at the same time as the physical examination.

Work Physicals

What Happens During a Work-Related Physical Exam?

During a work-related physical exam, we will check your overall health and look for possible symptoms of illness or chronic conditions that may keep you from performing the duties of your job. The tests your provider recommends will depend on the type of physical examination being conducted. You’ll review your medical health history and job information with your provider, if applicable. Your provider will usually check:

  • Vital signs – such as blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature.
  • Your heart – to detect possible signs of heart disease.
  • Your lungs – to listen for any wheezing or difficulty breathing.
  • Your abdomen – to check on the health of your liver, bowels, and other organs.
  • Your skin – skin problems can be signs and symptoms of other underlying illnesses.

X-Rays(Same day turnaround)